OngoingEn cours<div class="ExternalClassDE5D5BB8E0FE4423831031328DD3FDF5"><p> <strong>Focus&#58; Alleged crimes against humanity and war crimes committed in Afghanistan since 1 May 2003 </strong></p><p> <em> <br></em></p><div style="background-color&#58;#eeeeee;padding&#58;15px;margin&#58;15px 0px;"><p>On 20 November 2017, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (&quot;ICC&quot;), Fatou Bensouda, requested authorisation from Pre-Trial Chamber III to initiate an investigation into alleged war crimes and crimes against humanity in relation to the armed conflict in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan since 1 May 2003, as well as regarding similar crimes that have a nexus to the armed conflict in Afghanistan and are sufficiently linked to the Situation and were committed on the territory of other States Parties to the Rome Statute since 1 July 2002 (&quot;Situation in Afghanistan&quot;).</p><p>As per the ICC's legal framework, victims of alleged Rome Statute crimes committed in the Situation in Afghanistan have the right to submit &quot;representations&quot;, i.e. to provide their views, concerns and expectations, to the ICC Judges that are considering the Prosecutor's request. This process commenced pursuant to Regulation 50 of the Regulations of the Court on 20 November 2017 and ended on 31 January 2018,&#160;the deadline set by the ICC Judges for victims to submit representations. To help facilitate this process, the Victims Participation and Reparations Section (&quot;VPRS&quot;) of the ICC Registry prepared a template representation form which was available on the ICC website during the process, in a number of languages, until 31 January 2018.</p><p> <strong>The process of collection of representations of victims has now ended.&#160;</strong></p><p>Between 7 December 2017 and 9 February 2018, the VPRS transmitted to Pre-Trial Chamber III a total number of 699 victims representations. On 20 February 2018, the VPRS transmitted to the Judges a <a href="/RelatedRecords/CR2018_01452.PDF">final consolidated report</a> on victims' representations, containing an overview of the victim representations process, as well as details and statistics of the transmitted representations. </p><p>Pre-Trial Chamber III will now assess all representations received from victims, and in due course it will issue its decision on the Prosecutor's request. </p><p>Please contact the VPRS at <a href="https&#58;//mail.icc-cpi.int/owa/redir.aspx?C=6kKgxz91nJHZkpJrJXrKu05ueCewZmGkdfvLhTl6RtdgXVcNAmrVCA..&amp;URL=mailto&#58;VPRS.representations%40icc-cpi.int">VPRS.representations@icc-cpi.int</a>&#160;if you have any question or require additional information related to the Afghanistan Situation and any related issue.</p><div class="qA"><p class="formInput question plus">What was the ‘victim representation process’?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>Between late November 2017 and 31 January 2018, the ICC Registry collected representations from victims of crimes within the jurisdiction of the ICC committed on the territory of Afghanistan in the period since 1 May 2003, as well as other alleged crimes (i.e., those that have a nexus to the armed conflict in Afghanistan and are sufficiently linked to the Situation in Afghanistan and were committed on the territory of other States Parties to the Rome Statute since 1 July 2002). Victims had the possibility to tell the ICC Judges whether or not they want an ICC investigation, or to submit other related views. This is called “victims’ representations”. They were made in order to help the Judges decide whether or not to authorise the investigation and to understand any possible concerns about the scope of the investigation as outlined in the Prosecutor’s request. Victims did not need to prove that a crime was committed, they only had to explain what harm happened to them. </p><p>The deadline for victims to submit representations expired on <strong>31 January 2018</strong>, and this process is now over; the ICC Judges are considering the representations received. </p><p>As the event triggering the representation process, the ICC Office of the Prosecutor had requested authorisation from the Judges in late November 2017 to investigate&#58;</p><ol><li> <strong>crimes against humanity and war crimes</strong>, including murder, imprisonment or other severe deprivation of physical liberty, persecution on political and gender grounds, intentionally directing attacks against civilian population, humanitarian personnel and/or protected objects, conscription or enlistment and/or use in hostilities of children under the age of 15, and killing and wounding treacherously a combatant adversary by <strong>the Taliban and affiliated armed groups</strong>; </li><li> <strong>war crimes</strong>, including torture, cruel treatment, outrages upon personal dignity, and sexual violence by <strong>Afghan National Security Forces</strong>, and </li><li> <strong>war crimes</strong>, including torture, cruel treatment, outrages upon personal dignity, rape and other forms of sexual violence by <strong>US armed forces and members of the CIA</strong> on the territories of Afghanistan, Poland, Romania, and Lithuania.</li></ol><p>The ICC Judges ordered the Office of the Prosecutor to also provide information concerning allegations attributed to <strong>international military forces</strong> operating in Afghanistan.</p></div><p class="formInput question plus">What is happening now?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>All representation forms received from victims are sent to the ICC Judges only. They are also stored in a secure database accessed only by authorised ICC staff. The Judges can decide whether or not to share this information with the ICC Prosecutor. The ICC will prepare, in the coming weeks, a report on the views and concerns of victims; the original, complete report will be sent to the Judges, and a redacted version will be made public, so that <strong>no identifying information of any victim is disclosed to the public</strong>.</p><p>The Judges are now reviewing all representation forms received alongside the facts outlined in the Prosecutor’s request, and will then decide whether or not to authorise an investigation as outlined in the Prosecutor’s request. </p></div><p class="formInput question plus">Will the Court contact victims who submitted these forms?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>Most probably not individually. The ICC Judges will consider the victims’ views and concerns and they will make their decision whether or not to authorise an investigation based on what victims submitted to them, alongside the Prosecutor’s request. The Registry will keep the victims informed as to whether or not the Judges authorise the investigation, through the media and via those individuals who assisted victims in submitting their forms. </p></div><p class="formInput question plus">What can victims do later?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>At a later stage, <strong>if the Chamber authorises the investigation</strong>, victims can apply&#58;</p><ol><li>to participate in judicial proceedings against one or more individuals by giving their views and concerns through a legal representative and </li><li>for reparations, if the judicial proceedings lead to the conviction of the accused person(s).</li></ol><p>Victims who submitted representation forms are NOT automatically going to be able to participate in potential future judicial proceedings. They will need to apply separately for such presentation at a later stage.</p></div><p class="formInput question plus">Who is considered a “victim” before the ICC?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>Victims are persons who have suffered harm – to themselves or to their close family – as a result of any crime within the ICC’s jurisdiction. This harm can include physical or mental injury, emotional suffering, economic loss or substantial impairment of fundamental rights.</p><p>Victims may also include organisations and institutions when their property dedicated to certain purposes (religion, education, art or science or charitable and humanitarian purposes, or historic monuments and hospitals) is harmed as a result of a crime in the ICC’s jurisdiction. </p></div><p class="formInput question plus">What type of harm will the ICC Judges consider?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>The ICC Judges are likely to consider as harm not only physical harm to a person’s body, but also emotional suffering and material loss.</p></div><p class="formInput question plus">What are crimes against humanity?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>“Crimes against humanity” include any of the following acts committed as part of widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population, with knowledge of the attack&#58; murder; extermination; enslavement; deportation or forcible transfer of population; imprisonment; torture; rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, enforced sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity; persecution against an identifiable group on political, racial, national, ethnic, cultural, religious or gender grounds; enforced disappearance of persons; the crime of apartheid; other inhumane acts of a similar character intentionally causing great suffering or serious bodily or mental injury.</p></div> <p class="formInput question plus">What are war crimes?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>“War crimes” include grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions and other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in international armed conflict and in conflicts not of an international character listed in the Rome Statute, when they are committed as part of a plan or policy or on a large scale. These prohibited acts include&#58; murder; mutilation, cruel treatment and torture; taking of hostages; intentionally directing attacks against the civilian population; intentionally directing attacks against buildings dedicated to religion, education, art, science or charitable purposes, historical monuments or hospitals; pillaging; rape, sexual slavery, forced pregnancy or any other form of sexual violence; conscripting or enlisting children under the age of 15 years into armed forces or groups or using them to participate actively in hostilities.</p></div></div><p> <strong>Contact</strong></p><p>For any questions regarding the victims representations process and other related issues, please contact&#58;</p><p> <strong>Victims Participation and Reparations Section (VPRS)</strong><br> International Criminal Court<br> P.O. Box 19519, 2500 CM, The Hague, The Netherlands<br><a href="mailto&#58;VPRS.representations@icc-cpi.int">VPRS.representations@icc-cpi.int</a></p></div><p> <strong>Jurisdiction – General status</strong></p><p>Afghanistan deposited its instrument of <a href="https&#58;//asp.icc-cpi.int/en_menus/asp/states%20parties/asian%20states/Pages/afghanistan.aspx">accession</a> to the Rome Statute on 10 February 2003. The ICC may therefore exercise its jurisdiction over crimes listed in the Rome Statute committed on the territory of Afghanistan or by its nationals from 1 May 2003 onwards.</p><p> <strong>Procedural history and focus of the preliminary examination</strong></p><p>The preliminary examination of the situation in Afghanistan was made public in 2007. The OTP has received numerous communications under article 15 of the Rome Statute related to this situation. The preliminary examination focusses on crimes listed in the Rome Statute allegedly committed in the context of the armed conflict between pro-Government forces and anti-Government forces, including the <strong>crimes against humanity</strong> of murder, and imprisonment or other severe deprivation of physical liberty; and the <strong>war crimes</strong> of murder; cruel treatment; outrages upon personal dignity; the passing of sentences and carrying out of executions without proper judicial authority; intentional attacks against civilians, civilian objects and humanitarian assistance missions; and treacherously killing or wounding an enemy combatant. The preliminary examination also focusses on the existence and genuineness of national proceedings in relation to these crimes.<strong></strong></p></div><div class="ExternalClassFCBF80F825D44015ADEA966DCB82CE6D"><p></p></div><p> <strong>Enjeu&#160;&#58; crimes contre l'humanité prétendument commis en Afghanistan depuis le 1er&#160;mai 2003<br></strong></p><div style="background-color&#58;#eeeeee;padding&#58;15px;margin&#58;15px 0px;"><p>Le 20 novembre 2017, le Procureur de la Cour pénale internationale (CPI), Mme Fatou Bensouda, a demandé à la Chambre préliminaire III l’autorisation d’ouvrir une enquête sur des crimes de guerre et des crimes contre l’humanité qui auraient été commis en République islamique d’Afghanistan depuis le 1er mai 2003 en lien avec le conflit armé qui s’y déroule, ainsi que sur des crimes similaires qui ont un lien avec le conflit armé en Afghanistan, sont suffisamment liés à la situation dans ce pays et ont été commis sur le territoire d’autres États parties au Statut de Rome depuis le 1er juillet 2002 (« la situation en Afghanistan »).</p><p>Comme le prévoient les textes de la CPI, les victimes de crimes visés par le Statut de Rome qui auraient été commis dans le cadre de la situation en Afghanistan ont le droit d’adresser des « représentations », autrement dit de présenter leurs vues, préoccupations et attentes, aux juges de la CPI qui examinent la demande du Procureur. En application de la norme 50 du Règlement de la Cour, ce processus a débuté le 20 novembre 2017 et s’est terminé le 31 janvier 2018, date limite fixée par les juges de la CPI pour le dépôt des représentations des victimes. Pour faciliter le processus, la Section de la participation des victimes et des réparations, qui relève du Greffe de la CPI, a préparé un formulaire standard qui était disponible en plusieurs langues sur le site Web de la Cour pendant tout le déroulement de la procédure, à savoir jusqu’au 31 janvier 2018.</p><p> <strong>Le processus consistant à recueillir les représentations des victimes est à présent terminé</strong></p><p>La Section de la participation des victimes et des réparations s’apprête à envoyer aux juges de la CPI toutes les représentations reçues dans le délai fixé, afin de les aider dans leur décision d’autoriser ou non l’ouverture d’une enquête relative à tout ou partie de la demande d’autorisation d’enquêter sur la situation en Afghanistan présentée par le Procureur.</p><p>La Chambre préliminaire III examinera ensuite toutes les représentations reçues de victimes et rendra en temps voulu sa décision relative à la demande du Procureur.</p><p>Pour toute question ou pour en savoir davantage sur la situation en Afghanistan et sur toute question connexe, veuillez contacter la Section de la participation des victimes et des réparations à l’adresse suivante &#58; <a href="mailto&#58;VPRS.representations@icc-cpi.int">VPRS.representations@icc-cpi.int</a>.</p><div class="qA"><p class="formInputFR question plus">En quoi consistait le processus consistant à recueillir les représentations de victimes ?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>Entre la fin novembre 2017 et le 31 janvier 2018, le Greffe de la CPI a recueilli des représentations faites par des victimes de crimes relevant de la compétence de la Cour commis sur le territoire de l’Afghanistan depuis le 1er mai 2003, ainsi que d’autres crimes allégués (à savoir d’autres crimes qui ont un lien avec le conflit armé en Afghanistan, sont suffisamment liés à la situation en Afghanistan et ont été commis sur le territoire d’autres États parties au Statut de Rome depuis le 1er juillet 2002). Les victimes avaient la possibilité de dire aux juges de la CPI si elles souhaitent ou non que celle ci enquête, ou de présenter d’autres vues connexes. C’est ce qu’on appelle les « représentations des victimes » &#58; elles sont destinées à aider les juges à prendre la décision d’autoriser ou non l’enquête demandée et à comprendre toute préoccupation éventuelle relative au champ de l’enquête tel que défini dans la demande du Procureur. Les victimes ne devaient pas prouver qu’un crime était commis, elles devaient uniquement décrire le préjudice qu’elles avaient subi.</p><p>Le délai de dépôt des représentations de victimes a expiré le 31 janvier 2018 et ce processus est à présent terminé ; les juges de la CPI examinent les représentations reçues.</p><p>À l’origine du processus de représentations se trouve la demande adressée par le Bureau du Procureur de la CPI aux juges à la fin du mois de novembre 2017 afin d’obtenir l’autorisation d’enquêter sur &#58;</p><ol><li> <strong>des crimes comme l’humanité et des crimes de guerre, commis par les Talibans et des groupes armés affiliés</strong>, dont le meurtre, l’emprisonnement ou autre forme de privation grave de liberté physique, la persécution pour des motifs d’ordre politique et sexiste, le fait de diriger intentionnellement des attaques contre la population civile, le personnel humanitaire et/ou des biens protégés, la conscription ou l’enrôlement d’enfants de moins de 15 ans et/ou le fait de les faire participer à des hostilités et le fait de tuer ou de blesser par traîtrise un adversaire combattant ; </li><li> <strong>des crimes de guerre</strong>, commis par les <strong>Forces nationales de sécurité afghanes</strong>, dont la torture, les traitements cruels, les atteintes à la dignité de la personne et les violences sexuelles ; et </li><li> <strong>des crimes de guerre</strong>, commis par les <strong>forces armées américaines et des membres de la CIA</strong> sur les territoires de l’Afghanistan, de la Pologne, de la Roumanie et de la Lituanie, dont la torture, les traitements cruels, les atteintes à la dignité de la personne, le viol et d’autres formes de violence sexuelle.</li></ol><p>Les juges de la CPI ont ordonné au Bureau du Procureur de fournir également des informations au sujet d’allégations attribuées aux <strong>forces militaires internationales</strong> opérant en Afghanistan.</p></div><p class="formInputFR question plus">Que se passe-t-il à présent ?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>Tous les formulaires de représentations reçus des victimes sont envoyés uniquement aux juges de la CPI. Ils sont également conservés dans une base de données sécurisée dont l’accès est réservé au personnel autorisé de la CPI. Les juges peuvent décider de partager ou non les informations qu’ils ont reçues avec le Procureur de la CPI. Dans les semaines à venir, la CPI préparera un rapport sur les vues et préoccupations des victimes, dont la version originale et complète sera envoyée aux juges et dont une version expurgée sera rendue publique, l’expurgation visant à ce qu’<strong>aucune information permettant d’identifier une quelconque victime ne soit divulguée</strong>.</p><p>Les juges examinent à présent tous les formulaires de représentations reçus en regard des faits exposés dans la demande du Procureur et décideront ensuite d’autoriser ou non l’ouverture d’une enquête telle que demandée par le Procureur.</p></div><p class="formInputFR question plus">La Cour prendra-t-elle contact avec les victimes qui ont déposé ces formulaires ?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>Sans doute pas individuellement. Les juges de la CPI examineront les vues et préoccupations des victimes et décideront d’autoriser ou non une enquête sur la base des informations que les victimes leur ont communiquées et de la demande du Procureur. Le Greffe tiendra les victimes informées de la décision des juges par voie de presse ou par l’intermédiaire des personnes qui les ont aidées à présenter leurs formulaires.</p></div><p class="formInputFR question plus">Que peuvent faire les victimes à un stade ultérieur ?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>À un stade ultérieur, <strong>si la Chambre autorise l’enquête</strong>, les victimes peuvent &#58;</p><ol><li>demander à participer à la procédure judiciaire engagée contre une ou plusieurs personnes, en exposant leurs vues et préoccupations par l’intermédiaire d’un représentant légal ; et</li><li>demander des réparations, si l’accusé/les accusés est/sont reconnu(s) coupable(s) à l’issue de la procédure judiciaire.</li></ol><p>Les victimes qui ont présenté des formulaires de représentations ne pourront PAS automatiquement participer à toute procédure judiciaire qui pourrait être engagée par la suite. Elles devront faire une demande distincte à cette fin à un stade ultérieur.</p></div><p class="formInputFR question plus">Qui est considéré comme une « victime » devant la CPI ?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>Les victimes sont des personnes qui ont subi un préjudice — elles mêmes ou des membres de leur famille proche — du fait de la commission d’un crime relevant de la compétence de la CPI. Il peut s’agir d’une atteinte à l’intégrité physique ou mentale, d’une souffrance morale, d’une perte matérielle ou d’une atteinte grave aux droits fondamentaux.</p><p>Peuvent également être considérées comme des victimes toutes organisations ou institutions dont un bien consacré à certaines activités (religion, enseignement, arts, sciences, charité ou action humanitaire, ou encore des monuments historiques et des hôpitaux) a été endommagé du fait d’un crime relevant de la compétence de la CPI.</p></div><p class="formInputFR question plus">Quel type de préjudice sera pris en compte par les juges de la CPI ?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>Les juges de la CPI considèreront probablement comme préjudice non seulement l’atteinte à l’intégrité physique, mais aussi la souffrance morale et les pertes matérielles.</p></div><p class="formInputFR question plus">Qu’entend-on par « crimes contre l’humanité » ?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>On entend par « crimes contre l’humanité » l’un quelconque des actes ci-après lorsqu’il est commis dans le cadre d’une attaque généralisée ou systématique lancée contre toute population civile et en connaissance de cette attaque &#58; meurtre ; extermination ; réduction en esclavage ; déportation ou transfert forcé de population ; emprisonnent ; torture ; viol ; esclavage sexuel ; prostitution forcée ; grossesse forcée ; stérilisation forcée ou toute autre forme de violence sexuelle de gravité comparable ; persécution d’un groupe identifiable pour des motifs d’ordre politique, racial, national, ethnique, culturel, religieux ou sexiste ; disparitions forcées de personnes ; crime d’apartheid ; autres actes inhumains de caractère analogue causant intentionnellement de grandes souffrances ou des atteintes graves à l’intégrité physique ou à la santé mentale.</p></div><p class="formInputFR question plus">Qu’entend-on par « crimes de guerre » ?</p><div class="explanation answer"><p>On entend par « crimes de guerre » les infractions graves aux Conventions de Genève ainsi que d’autres violations graves des lois et coutumes applicables aux conflits armés internationaux et aux conflits ne présentant pas un caractère international, visés par le Statut de Rome, lorsque ces crimes s’inscrivent dans le cadre d’un plan ou d’une politique ou lorsqu’ils sont commis sur une grande échelle. On peut citer, entre autres, parmi les actes prohibés &#58; le meurtre ; les mutilations ; les traitements cruels et la torture ; la prise d’otages ; le fait de diriger intentionnellement des attaques contre la population civile ; le fait de diriger intentionnellement des attaques contre des bâtiments consacrés à la religion, à l’enseignement, à l’art, à la science ou à l’action caritative, des monuments historiques ou des hôpitaux ; le pillage ; le viol ; l’esclavage sexuel ; la grossesse forcée ou toute autre forme de violence sexuelle ; le fait de procéder à la conscription ou à l’enrôlement d’enfants de moins de 15 ans dans les forces armées ou dans des groupes armés ou de les faire participer activement à des hostilités.</p></div></div><p> <strong>Contact</strong></p><p>Pour toute question relative au processus des représentations faites par les victimes et à toute question connexe, veuillez prendre contact avec &#58;</p><p> <strong>Section de la participation des victimes et des réparations </strong><br>Cour pénale internationale<br> B.P. 19519, 2500 CM, La Haye Pays‐Bas<br><a href="mailto&#58;VPRS.representations@icc-cpi.int">VPRS.representations@icc-cpi.int</a></p></div> <p> <strong>Compétence – Situation générale</strong></p><p>L'Afghanistan a déposé son instrument d'<span lang="FR"><a href="https&#58;//asp.icc-cpi.int/en_menus/asp/states%20parties/asian%20states/Pages/afghanistan.aspx">adhésion</a></span> au Statut de Rome le 10&#160;février 2003. La CPI a par conséquent compétence à l'égard des crimes visés par le Statut de Rome commis sur le territoire afghan ou par des ressortissants afghans à compter du 1<sup>er</sup>&#160;mai 2003.</p><p> <strong>Historique de la procédure et enjeu de l'examen préliminaire</strong></p><p>L'examen préliminaire de la situation en Afghanistan a été rendu public en 2007. Le Bureau a reçu de nombreuses communications, au titre de l'article&#160;15 du Statut de Rome, relatives à cette situation. L'examen préliminaire porte essentiellement sur les crimes visés par le Statut de Rome qui auraient été commis dans le cadre du conflit armé entre les forces progouvernementales et les forces antigouvernementales, notamment les <strong>crimes contre l'humanité</strong> suivants&#160;&#58; meurtre et emprisonnement ou autre forme de privation grave de liberté&#160;; et les <strong>crimes de guerre</strong> suivants&#160;&#58; meurtre, traitements cruels, atteintes à la dignité de la personne, condamnations prononcées et exécutions effectuées sans autorisation de l'autorité judiciaire compétente, attaques dirigées intentionnellement contre la population civile, des biens de caractère civil et des missions d'aide humanitaire, et tuer ou blesser par traîtrise un adversaire combattant. L'examen préliminaire porte également sur l'existence et l'authenticité de procédures nationales relatives à ces crimes.</p>AfghanistanAfghanistan